Moving On Back

Well, quite a while back I thought I would shut down this website and move all my posts over to Facebook. But, interested folks continue to visit and I’m still dealing with the results of surviving necrotizing fasciitis 21 years ago. I hope I can continue to provide resources to those affected by the disease.

Recently, there was some concern I may develop a Marjolin’s ulcer on my Achilles tendon and so I’ve been seeking treatment for over two years and have been in active wound care for the past six months. In November I finally had a Moh’s procedure to remove a squamous cell carcinoma and covered the wound with a split-thickness skin graft. The cancer appears to have recently developed — the offending cells were on the surface around the perimeter of the wound and hadn’t moved down into the tissue. Caught it just in the nick of time, I think.

You can read more about Marjolin’s ulcers in the link and I hope to talk a bit more about my course of treatment in upcoming posts. Meanwhile, you can also find me over on Facebook.

The Paradox of Chronic Pain

Yesterday, I spent the afternoon with a friend, who lives in constant pain from a degenerative back ailment. We were discussing how often God blesses us through our fallen, broken, mortal bodies. If Jeremy Linneman is correct, 40 percent of Americans suffer from chronic pain. I’m one of them. Here’s why suffering can be a gift from The Paradox of Chronic Pain:

It is a constant and demanding journey; it is supremely complex and often seemingly meaningless; and there is no cure for the hardship or hope for restoration in this world itself. Chronic pain, like every type of suffering, is a form of brokenness that drives us to Christ. When the pain persists, there’s simply nowhere else to go.

I’m reminded of this exchange from John’s Gospel:

After this many of his disciples turned back and no longer walked with him. So Jesus said to the Twelve, “Do you want to go away as well?” Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life, and we have believed, and have come to know, that you are the Holy One of God” (John 6:66–69 ESV)

Spike In Flesh-eating Disease In Rochester Area

Most people who get necrotizing fasciitis have other health problems that may lower their body’s ability to fight infection. Some of these conditions include diabetes, kidney disease, cancer, or other chronic health conditions that weaken the body’s immune system.

via Spike in flesh-eating disease in Rochester area – Rochester infectious disease | Examiner.com.

Classical Guitarist 10 Years After Surviving NF

Another amazing survivor story!

“Henderson was stricken with necrotizing fasciitis, a flesh-eating bacteria in his right arm more than 10 years ago and was in a coma for nine days. When he awoke, he said his first request was for his guitar to see if he could still play. During his recovery, he learned how to rely more on his left-hand strumming the strings on the neck of the guitar and developed a unique and complicated style of playing.”

Read the entire article here: Pop Music Plans for Classical Guitarist – Laguna Local News.

The Lee Spark Necrotising Fasciitis Foundation

These folks came online just about the same time I took our story to the web. Check out their site !

The mission of The Lee Spark Necrotising Fasciitis (NF) Foundation is to help those whose lives have been affected by necrotising fasciitis and other severe streptococcal infections and medical staff who are involved with investigating, diagnosing and treating NF.

via Welcome – The Lee Spark Necrotising Fasciitis (NF) Foundation.